US Lowpoint Guide

Wild World with Sable and Brewster by visiting them every day. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Dark Souls has Rhea and Quelana. In the city, the population was spread out with Our writers, many of them Ph. She grows to care about the others a lot.


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Click on the Cannon to Contact Me. At first, he fails to notice that everything is different from what he remembers. Eventually, an opportunity to work on a wooden sailing ship comes along and he takes it, entranced with the idea of regular meals and a place to sleep.

But few things are ever as simple as they sound, and he is not warmly greeted by the other sailors. He starts to learn the job, but, of course, the journey is interrupted when the ship is captured by pirates. Chris refuses to sign their articles and thus becomes their prisoner. Rather improbably, the captain of the pirates, Bram Bart, takes a liking to him, and after they capture another vessel and decide to make it into a consort, Bart offers the command to Chris. Thus the real adventures of the book begin.

The captured boat is a slaver, and Chris sells the slaves and keeps the money to buy another vessel, but ends up getting robbed. He has to join the buccaneers on Tortuga for a time to make some money. Then he and Melind, a man he befriends while living as a buccaneer, and a few others capture a ship in the night and take it over.

The boat includes some Spanish prisoners, two or four men and a boy, who asks to speak to Chris in private. She also plays a central role in running the ship. We are never told an exact year either lives in, although we are given some hints. Pirate Chris talks about how long it took him to learn to load a musket and utilizes some of his modern-day knowledge to make a few alterations and improvements to the ship to assist the pirates in capturing prizes.

Father Chris reminisces about his father teaching him to shoot a laser pistol. He also comments on reading modern stories of pirates and about Anne Bonny and Mary Read. He believes that Novia was probably just as fierce, if not more so, than they were. The story is set in the age of wooden sail, and Wolfe seems to have done his homework about the period fairly well.

Chris faces many moral challenges, both as a priest and a pirate. Because of his childhood upbringing in a monastery school, he often agonizes over some of the choices he faces in order for his crew and himself to survive. He experiences guilt over the plight of some of his victims. As the story draws to its conclusion, his biggest moral choice becomes whether to travel back in time to warn himself about leaving the monastery and being sent back in time, or to rejoin his lover from his pirate days.

Personally, I found the contrasts and his inner struggle about what is right and wrong to be insightful and interesting. As part of their adventures, they take what they soon learn from the captured crew is a cursed ship. Several sailors have disappeared or turned up dead.

Some of the obstacles they encounter resemble the hardships Morgan and his men endured during their land campaigns, but this is the only part of the book that feels as if some of it may have been taken from a real pirate story. Pirate Freedom has very nice illustrations at the beginning of each chapter, which adds a nice touch to the story.

The paperback I bought is pages and has a glossary at the end to help with a few terms and locations. Overall, I rate this book at four stars, only because of the large amount of narration throughout the story. She and her family have lived and endured in this coastal Massachusetts town for three generations, and her life promises more of the same drudgery once the visitors return home for another fall and winter.

Only a mysterious phone call from her beloved, but rarely seen, Uncle Patrick promises any excitement, but even she is astonished with the news he shares. While most would be skeptical, Shannon easily comes to terms with the possibility.

What happened to Anne after her conviction has long been a mystery. She simply vanished from the historical record. But Patrick recounts how she disappeared and lived to die of old age under another name. He also shares information about the possibility that together he and Shannon may be able to recover treasure that Anne and Jack buried centuries ago.

They have no map, but Anne did leave clues. Although a long shot at best, Patrick and Shannon set off on an adventure that takes them to Florida, the Caribbean, and South Carolina.

They also cross paths with human traffickers, the FBI, and an informant. Beyond Beauport is a well-spun tale of a Gloucester woman who must come to terms, as we all do, with her past and her family.

Along the way, we are introduced to some piratical history and two New Englanders, Captain Jonathan Haraden and Sailing Master Nathaniel Haraden — brave and daring men who left their mark on seafaring history during the early days of the American republic. There are a few scenes, such as the bar in South Florida, that might rub some readers the wrong way, but the story is portrayed both realistically and believably.

One weakness is the lack of tension. Only once and briefly will readers feel as if Shannon and Patrick are truly in danger. What Masciarelli achieves best is paying homage to Gloucester women: Meet the author Listen to an interview. Savage Winds By Michelle C. Born into one of the leading mob families, she has tried hard to distance herself from the unsavory ties that eventually killed her parents, but now they are after her beloved Uncle Louis, who raised her.

In the ensuing struggle, an explosion flings Ana into the depths of the Caribbean. This is a ship of wood and sails where the captain has a strange English accent and he and his men wear outfits from the past. At first, she assumes they are re-enactors, but soon discovers that she has traveled back in time to the early nineteenth century.

Jacen Stirling has little time to deal with the beautiful woman whose unfamiliar words and skimpy outfit puzzle him. A brief stop at Nassau to take on supplies adds to the urgency of his mission.

Amassing in the harbor is a fleet of many Royal Navy ships, most certainly the invasion fleet bound for New Orleans. Should Jacen fail, she will be delivered back to his ship. In his absence, she ministers to the slaves on a nearby plantation. There are several historical inaccuracies.

Tricorn hats were not part of American military uniforms of this period; holystones — used to scrub the decks of wooden ships — were blocks of sandstone, rather than bristle brushes; and in , William Claiborne was governor of the state of Louisiana, not the territorial governor. For the most part, these are minor slips when examined from the perspective of the entire story.

Getting back to her own time period never seems a priority, perhaps because there is no simple answer of how one travels through time when disappearing in the Bermuda Triangle and she has no family left to go back to. This makes for a more believable story.

For me, the second time-slip is much stronger, fantastically portrayed in a way that makes us look anew at our own world and the technology we take for granted. This spicy romance successfully intertwines humor and drama to spin a web of intrigue and danger. Aside from the historical aspects of the story, I was drawn to the sketches that Jacen draws. The reason for their inclusion remains unclear until the final pages, which then makes perfect sense but kept me guessing not an easy feat to achieve.

As the historical events of the War of unfold, disparate forces must work together to protect the fledgling United States, while Ana and Jacen struggle to keep both themselves and their burgeoning love alive. This is the most time she has spent in his company, for he rarely had time for her until he announces that her beloved mother and grandfather are dead. But even at sea he often ignores her. Her only solace is her friend, cabin boy and lookout William Spencer, and her cherished book that recounts the exploits of real pirates like Anne Bonny and Blackbeard.

Maribel loves to climb aloft to read or to join William in searching for other vessels. When sails are sighted, he thinks it might be the Ghost Ship whose captain and crew materialize out of thin air to attack Spanish vessels. They take no prisoners, leave no witnesses. Still, Maribel hopes to finally meet a pirate. Although she scoffs at the idea that the strange ship is a ghost, she decides to join too. The last time their paths crossed twenty years ago, Jean barely survived after Cordoba ordered the captured ship sunk with all hands and passengers on board.

Falling debris knocks Mirabel unconscious during the battle between the two enemy vessels. When Jean boards, he ignores the colorful lump on the deck.

He seeks only one outcome — vengeance for the deaths of his mother and baby brother. But his second in command, Isaac Bennett, attempts to dissuade Jean because revenge belongs to the Lord.

Enraged, Jean attacks his nemesis and the two men fall overboard. Cordoba sinks into the depths of the ocean. Only after Jean returns to his ship does he discover that his crew has brought aboard the wounded Mirabel.

Mirabel, of course, has the perfect solution. She knows all about pirates, so she should join his crew. Following orders, however, is not her strong suit, which lands her in the brig after kicking Jean.

He soon discovers that this brazen girl has wormed her way into the stalwart hearts of ne and his men and, before long, is one of the crew — a temporary inconvenience only. Contrary to what her father told Mirabel, her mother and grandfather still live. When her grandfather discovers his granddaughter is gone, he vows to find her no matter how long or how much money it requires. On learning that his son is dead and that French privateers have taken Mirabel, he wields the full power of his influence within French circles to have Louis XV declare Jean Beaumont and his men pirates.

Still at sea, Jean remains ignorant that he is now considered an outlaw and that French and Spanish warships hunt the Ghost Ship. They attack another vessel and during this engagement, Mirabel is swept into the sea. Only later is it discovered that she is missing. After an exhausting day of searching for her, Jean retires to his cabin while Israel and his longboat continue the hunt. The warship is the victor, and they imprison the pirates and take the Ghost Ship with them to New Orleans.

With nowhere else to go, Israel sails to an island so the nuns there can nurse and raise Mirabel. In the years that follow, Mother Superior tells her that she only dreams about pirates, but Mirabel knows they are really memories.

One day she hopes to reunite with the handsome pirate captain and her pirate friends. The Pirate Bride is the latest installment in the Daughters of the Mayflower series and takes place in two parts. Part one, which sets the stage for the romance and underlying mysteries that unfold in part two, interweaves adventure with humor and heartache, and includes several unexpected twists. The characters capture our hearts, much like Mirabel manages to do with the privateers, and transport us back to The subsequent half of the story provides an intriguing study of how someone raised on an isolated island reenters a world governed by strict rules, proper etiquette, and specific social orders.

There are times when the reader feels almost as left out as Maribel did when she left Spain. Employing the slave trade and its ties to piracy as a means of bringing Jean and Maribel together again is historically accurate and a refreshing theme from usual romances of this type, but the subplots of the second half are told more than shown, which prevents readers from becoming fully involved.

As an inspirational romance, The Pirate Bride is a pleasing tale into which the religious aspect is subtly knitted. Meet the author Daughters of the Mayflower. If he succeeds, they will lose the Italian provinces and leave Britain to fight alone.

While the Council of Ten in Venice prefers to remain neutral in this war, the Venetian admiral would form an alliance with England and lead his navy in the fight against the aggressors.

But before negotiations are completed, Il Diavolo the Devil has his assassins kill the admiral. Nathaniel Peake captains HMS Unicorn and, having had a successful voyage, he looks forward to receiving the hefty sum his captured prizes will bring. Arriving at Leghorn, a major center of trade in the Mediterranean, he finds the city under attack from land, the citizens attempting to flee by sea, and French corsairs lurking on the horizon.

Not only is he tasked with escorting the convoy of rescue ships, he must defend them against these sea marauders and transport the paramours of some officers, including Commodore Nelson, to safety. The last proves a trying and irritating duty that results in the loss of his quarters, but he succeeds in delivering the ladies as ordered.

He needs to re-establish contact with Venice, notify the admiral that his price has been met, keep the Venetians from forming an alliance with France, and assess the seaworthiness and capabilities of the Venetian fleet. At the same time, he must take soundings of the harbors and lagoons while hunting down French corsairs prowling the Adriatic Sea. Now he must confirm this report and determine if there is another willing to work with the British to stop Napoleon, and this requires him to enlist the assistance of the Deputy Prioress of a convent where the sisters are known for their gambling casino and carnal knowledge.

He will do whatever is necessary to dispose of the British intruder, and it could cost Nathan his life. Since there are a variety of winds specific to the Mediterranean, he provides a brief explanation of these since they play important roles in the story. This is the fourth installment in the Nathan Peake series, but readers unfamiliar with previous tales will have no problem following this story. There are sufficient clues to tantalize such readers to go back and read these titles.

In many ways the opening chapters of The Winds of Folly mimic what it is like to sail aboard a wooden ship — manic high drama of short duration interspersed with long and tedious periods of mundane daily activity.

Little Pegleg the Pirate: Treasure Islands By D. Five boys and two girls are eleven and twelve years old, and the other lad is six. As each child steps aboard the ship, they acquire pirate personas, special abilities that compensate for their disabilities, and special gifts each must learn to use.

Samuel becomes Little Pegleg, the captain, and his prosthesis becomes a wooden leg. Jerome Christopher transforms into a non-stuttering, suave pirate. Harvey and his wheelchair become Harley whose biker-chair has cannons and flames that allow him to fly short distances.

Paul, who already wears an eye-patch , is now Paulie with a spyglass that allows him to see far and wide. Ernest, whose right hand is deformed, changes into Ernie and his hand becomes a hook. When they acquire a piece of this jigsaw puzzle, their next destination appears along with a special clue as to what they might encounter there. The religious component to this story is very strong and may not appeal to all readers.

Readers may also find some material and subjects covered, as well as the language, objectionable and definitely not appropriate for children; Hewitt is upfront about this before the book begins.

As the story progresses the lighter adventure becomes darker and darker, and the gun incident involving one of the children, as well as the aftermath of the shooting, struck me as being out-of-character for the young pirates and their friendships.

It also caught me unaware, like a sudden slap in the face, and while the story does have a happy ending, getting there left me feeling uneasy about allowing children, and possibly younger and immature teens, to read this book. Aside from some formatting and spelling errors, as well as the occasional missing word, I also wonder about the target audience.

The one aspect of this book that I particularly identified with was that these eight characters have physical disabilities and they find ways to overcome those challenges. Too often such characters are omitted from stories, even when these tales can be truly inspiring to read. No longer will he work for other men, commanding their merchant ships. Now he will own his own ship and be his own master.

Unfortunately, when he sets sail from London in November , he discovers that the fates have a far different plan in store for him and the Ruby Cross. Ever since her husband chose to go to sea in search of treasure, Catherine Fry has had to fend for herself, her young son, and her frail mother. They live in squalor and at the mercy of the denizens who prey on the unfortunate.

One of them, a particularly vicious and smug man named Simon Brewer, holds her son and mother hostage. No matter the cost, Catherine vows to rescue her family. He convinces his men to follow Catherine, and they set sail to hunt down Thomas Glanville and the gold cross encrusted with rubies. Barnet has ulterior motives, though; he loves Catherine and with her husband dead and her being at the mercy of Brewer, Barnet seizes this opportunity to finally get her to marry him.

Thomas bides his time, waiting for the right moment to turn the tables on the pirates, but before long he and Catherine wonder just who is torturing whom. When Barnet discovers what has happened between the two, his jealousy endangers not only Robert but Catherine and the lives of her son and mother. A slim chance of salvation remains, but it requires Thomas, a pirate captive, to trust Catherine, the woman who wishes to destroy his dream.

The pacing of the story — which takes place over a fortnight, a fact not revealed until near the end of the book — is propelled by riveting action that makes His Pirate Seductress a good swashbuckler. What keeps the book from being a great swashbuckling adventure is its length.

A longer tale would have permitted deeper character development to allow readers to get to know and care about the hero and heroine and what happens to them.

Although his suspicions are confirmed, there is nothing Robert can do until a Captain of the Marines delivers a letter from Lord John Churchill. The missive outlines attacks Archer made on property of the Grand Moghul of India.

There are several caveats to hunting down Archer. Also, the Captain of the Marines and a reformed pirate who once sailed with Archer are to accompany Robert on this trek. With a cargo meant to lure the pirate from his lair, Robert and his companions set sail for the Caribbean.

But finding Archer takes time, for no one is certain where he is and the West Indies has many ideal places where he can shelter. Better proofreading, less awkward phrasing of some sentences and, since time is of the essence, inserting more tension in some scenes would benefit the story. In spite of these flaws, MacHugh and the Faithless Pirate incorporates gripping action scenes that whisk the reader into the midst of fierce storms, pirate chases, and perilous battles. Read an excerpt Meet the authors Flint and Gannon.

Combat with Pirates By Harold J. At eleven years old, he dreams of adventure and he and his four friends — Mic 12 , Baldric 9 , and twins Jan and Joost — are away playing pirates, but race home to warn their parents. Their mothers, fathers, and siblings lie dead or are slaughtered while the boys watch. They themselves barely escape with their lives aboard a boat that washed up on the island earlier.

His youngest sister had caught him sneaking out of the house and wanted to go with him, but he said no. Now little Anneke is dead, and her murder haunts his thoughts and dreams. Eventually, they are rescued by French pirates, who offer them a safe haven, but actually have something else in store for the boys.

And the life they imagined as pirates is far different in reality. Before they separate, the boys vow to reunite in seven years at the end of their indenture.

Alone for the first time in his life, Dirk serves a buccaneer, an abusive man who hunts beef then smokes the meat to sell to traders and pirates. It is a hard life, but Dirk learns the trade. But even here the Spanish hunt and slaughter the buccaneers, some of whom befriend Dirk.

Seeking revenge, however, comes with consequences; rather than the death he expects, he is sold once again — this time to four men who teach him new skills. By the time the seven years have passed, Dirk has acquired all but one skill needed to become a pirate — leading men. Aside from reuniting with his friends, one driving force rules his life.

He vows vengeance on all Spaniards. The pirate crew they join knows only one way to attack, and eventually their victims learn to thwart their tactics. After Dirk rescues the pirates from one failed escapade, they elect him as their captain.

But being their leader comes with its own baggage. This novel spans seventeen years from the Caribbean to New Amsterdam. I enjoyed this book, although I felt several times the pace slowed too much. But these are personal preferences and not all readers will agree with me. A Tall Ship, a Star, and Plunder.

One story features a Flying Dutchman kind of ghost ship, but seeing this one does not portend a shipwreck. The effect on his spouse and the way she combats his affliction draws to an exciting and dramatic climax. This tale has definite nightmare potential so beware! As a former avid reader of science-fiction, I always enjoy any stories involving time travel.

Actual pirates on wooden ships attacking and plundering any vessel they can chase down. Riddell Pirates of Happenstance by H. One casualty is General George Washington, and soon after the rebellion is put down. Tennesseans, however, live on the frontier away from the British, and in they declare themselves a free state. The community of Jacksonville thrives, but the influx of non-Catholics who refuse to heed Spanish laws eventually alarms the Mexican authorities.

Andrew Jackson, though, has no intention of surrendering his freedom or power. After a near-fatal run-in with a Spanish frigate in April and a double-dealing employer, John Paul Jones II leaves New Orleans and returns home to Baltimore, only to find that his family is dead.

Crockett hires Jones to find a suitable ship that can be outfitted — illegally and surreptitiously — as a naval warship. Crockett is dubious that the ramshackle vessel will ever amount to anything, but Jones proves him wrong. But the captain of the Spanish frigate knows of the rebel vessel and is hunting for the elusive Wasp and her captain.

This alternative history novel, the first in a series, presents an interesting series of what-ifs about the early days of Texas history. The problem, though, is that the author tends to lead the reader to an exciting point in the story, then steps back to let Lautenberg tell what happens. No one suspects his past life as the notorious pirate Cain. Only one man could have betrayed him — his best friend and business partner, Richard Grey, who once served as his first mate aboard The Kraken , a pirate ship.

With the help of the Flying Gang, Cain escapes and sails to England to exact his revenge. But India Prescott is far from the docile and fragile lady Cain expects. Tempers and pride clash until she strikes Cain and he locks her in his cabin until she confesses. In the days that follow, Cain repeatedly interrogates her, but she defies him, which only adds to his ire. She refuses to believe he and Teddy are the same person, for Teddy is kind and well-mannered, the man of her dreams and nothing like this fearsome pirate.

Seasick and stubborn, India eventually falls deathly ill, forcing Cain to tend her and, in doing so, she reawakens the goodness and decency within him. He ignores his growing attraction for her, because Richard has forever robbed him of his hopes and dreams. Noted for her contemporary and paranormal romances, Ashgrove delves into the realm of historical romance with this first entry in The Flying Gang Legacy series. Normally, if a book fails to capture my attention within the first sixty pages, I set it aside and find another title to read.

The betrayal and injustice established in the opening pages of Bound by Decency nudged me to keep reading, however, and once the action reignites, the voyage does not disappoint.

But nothing erases the horrific memories of what he endured during those years — a time when he changed from a boy of six to a man. In spite of his scholarly education and his piratical training in the art of sailing, fighting, and plundering, he has much to learn about women — who frequently betray him.

Angela Lindell yearns to marry Philippe, but when he asks for her hand, her father refuses. With her intended now living in New Orleans, She decides to go there rather than marry the elderly baron her father has selected. The last person she expects to encounter is the notorious and terrifying Captain Kit Saber. But he has a penchant for attacking ships belonging to Sheridan Shipping.

After she dares to defy him, she and Emily find themselves tied to the mast as the ship sinks. She might intend to wed another, but Kit, rather than Philippe, consumes her thoughts. To Angela Kit is a pirate, but he and his men consider themselves privateers.

Should war resume with France, he will abandon his current pursuit to fight Napoleon. Taking Angela to New Orleans is the last thing he wants to do, until he learns that the elusive woman he has hunted for a decade is there.

Only she can answer the burning questions he has regarding the deadly intrigue that killed his mother and landed him among pirates. But repercussions from that journey result in a final confrontation with his father and a farewell to the woman who finally wins his heart. Capture the Wind is laced with humor and mystery.

The chemistry between Angela and Kit unfolds much like a spark ignites gunpowder. This captivating tale of love will delight readers of historical fiction, and the blossoming romance between Emily and Dylan is the icing on the cake.

These secondary characters almost steal the show. Capture the Wind is the perfect escape for readers who yearn to curl up in a leather chair before a roaring fire on a wintry day. Silver is painted as a feared and fearless person. Perhaps his most ruthless act ends this part of the story.

We meet a young lad who gets a good education, complete with learning Latin. A confrontation with the only person he ever feared, his parson, sends him running to the docks and the start of his seafaring life. He is determined to learn his new trade well and is devoted to his ship. The inner workings of his superior mind are laid bare to readers, who already know he ends up as a pirate, but have no idea how or when he makes that transition.

These do seem a bit drawn out and only the future references to Treasure Island and Captain Flint give the reader motivation to continue. Finally with his story complete, he talks of his final days and his life of enforced ease. Until Henri discovers that his new brother-in-law is impotent and has arranged for several friends to bed his new bride in hopes of producing an heir.

Born a bastard and fawned off to be raised by an abusive farmer, Lieutenant Crawford Treynor wants only one thing from his mother, Lady Bedford, — to know the identity of his father — but their relationship is adversarial and neither can set aside past hurts for love to heal old wounds. He strives to prove to others that he is a good and honorable man in spite of his upbringing, and he hopes to one day captain his own ship.

When the French boy tries to desert, Treynor steps in and takes the ten lashes meant for the boy. Better known for her contemporary romances and romantic suspense stories, Novak sets out to write a historical romance — what she started to write when she first wanted to become an author — and her skill at crafting an exciting novel that blends intrigue, humor, passion, and right triumphing over wrong makes The Bastard a tale not to be missed.

Her research on the Royal Navy and ships shines through, but never intrudes. For those seeking romance on the high seas, breath-taking action, an entire cast of characters who spring to life and change as the hero and heroine spar and love, The Bastard is well worth the voyage. Read an excerpt Meet the author. Pleasures of a Tempted Lady.

When they spot a jolly boat adrift in the water, Will never imagines one of its passengers is Meg Donovan, the woman he loved and lost her after she fell overboard on her way home to Antigua. David, however, is suspicious of the Meg, and believes she may be in league with the smuggler.

While Meg loves William, she dare not tell him about the past two years of her life. To do so would only endanger his life and the lives of her sisters, who now reside in London.

Plucked from the Atlantic, Meg expected the captain of the rescue ship to see her safely home. Instead, the pirate imprisoned her and forced her to teach his wife how to be a lady. Emotionally and physically abused during her captivity, Meg has learned to reveal only what she needs to.

The pirate captain, however, has no intention of letting Meg go. Once he finds her, he will kill her and take back his son. And his brother, who ranks high among the English nobility, is more than willing to assist him.

Will Meg learn to trust Will, to believe that he can protect her from this evil, even if he must die in the process? Or will the secrets they both keep destroy their love forever? While the title of this book remains a mystery, this historical romance takes place in the s and combines the infancy of steam-powered ships with vessels propelled only by the wind.

Even though this book is part of a series, the reader need not have read the earlier titles. Haymore writes a captivating tale whose characters rise from the page and share their foibles and strengths until readers find themselves caught in a spidery web of danger and intrigue from which they cannot escape until the story ends.

After all, Belinda is self-centered, spoiled, and pregnant, not to mention the fact that the United States and Great Britain are at war with each other — which is precisely why Belinda must go. Her husband, a privateer, is held in a prison hulk on the Thames, and with the help of a Scottish privateer, she intends to rescue him.

Rafael Docherty would only offer Belinda this chance if he gets something in return. Rather than abandon the idea, Belinda has Phoebe kidnapped. Still the attraction they both feel becomes stronger as each day progresses, even though whispers of mutiny circulate among the crew because Rafe refuses to attack enemy ships with the ladies on board.

When an accident nearly kills Mel, Rafe discovers there is a traitor on his brig. But who is it? It is a tale that sweeps the reader onto the high seas, without drowning the reader with storm-tossed waves of nautical details and language.

She did and her knowledge of wooden ships and sailing shine through, but never intrude. The war is merely the backdrop for the tale and never takes center stage until the final third of the book. When it does, the story becomes compelling and breathtaking. As a result, when Rafe finally confronts his nemesis, the depth is present, but not the power one expects.

In doing so, they also learn the true meaning of love. The strict rules the British captain enforces on her, however, make the voyage no better than a prison. Warren Rawlins, a Boston merchant and captain of the Huntress , comes across a ship in distress. The British attacked her and imprisoned a number of her crew, including his two younger brothers.

Within minutes of meeting her future husband, Lorena discovers he is not the man she hoped. Rules and regulations define Mordaunt, and he has worked hard to achieve his current position and to gain a bride whose dowry includes a third share in a profitable shipping business.

When Lorena defies him, he slaps her and forces her to remain outside his home through the hottest part of the day without food or drink. Unfortunately, she concentrates so much on the romance, the villain remains one-dimensional and his pursuit of the lovers and the danger they face never seems more than surface. Even so, Prisoner of Desire i s a fast-paced voyage filled with love and humor that lures readers in and once captured, they will find the book hard to put down. The Chocolate Pirate Plot.

They perform acrobatic feats, dance a few jigs, and spout typical pirate lingo, then disappear just as suddenly as they appeared. Instead of finding him, they locate the body of another man. Before long Lee finds herself mired in a murder and kidnapping. As she investigates this latest Chocoholic mystery, her tangled tongue causes further problems. With the chocolate shop serving as the centralized location, readers meet various residents and visitors to the quaint resort town.

Interspersed through the story, usually at those cliffhanging moments, Carl provides tidbits about the history and science of chocolate. The pirates provide a peripheral, yet intriguing, twist on this whodunit where past encounters impact the present. The pirates eventually take center stage, but not quite as expected. If you need an escape from the hectic pace of life, The Chocolate Pirate Plot is a satisfying diversion.

They fear the unknown and those who stray from the strict standards governing the village. This trepidation comes to a boil when three people — a stranger washed ashore after a storm, a girl who dreams of the future, and a Nauset who holds to the traditions and beliefs of his people — cross paths on colonial Cape Cod. Rather than submit to further abuse from the captain of a merchant ship, Samuel Bellamy jumps overboard. He washes ashore, where he is taken care of by John Julian, one of the native people of the island.

Eventually, he seeks employment in Eastham, but few will employ him, and he lacks sufficient funds to marry Maria Hallett, a local girl with a kindred spirit. But others have similar notions and before long, Sam and Palgrave decide if they wish to gain a fortune, they must turn pirate. Ever since, whispers of witchcraft have circulated in spite of her weekly attendance at Sunday service. One reason for this is that Maria has a wandering soul, one that longs to visit far off places — a dream no Puritans in the village understand, including her mother and stepfather.

When she seeks out an elderly widow who lives alone and has knowledge of plants that can heal people, Maria again falls under suspicions of witchcraft. Such ungodliness is further supported when it becomes known that she has slept with Bellamy. With his parents dead and his own people viewing him as someone to be shunned, John spends much of his time alone. He works for a local smuggler, who eventually agrees to sell him land, where he hopes to bring other tribal members to live and practice the ways of their ancestors.

My reservations about this the book stem from the manner in which the author chose to tell the story. After reading the prologue, where the three primary characters are introduced in separate scenes, I expected the author to interweave their stories. In spite of this personal proviso, Pieces of Eight is a unique recasting of the popular Cape Cod legend.

He deftly demonstrates how religion, fear, and prejudice can come together in constructive and destructive ways with profound, and sometimes tragic, outcomes. Sailing differs from his life in the Cuban orphanage, but his faith and the reassurances of Sister Elena give him the courage to try. Angel Perez, the cook, soon befriends him and streetwise Alberto Monson becomes the older brother Jose never had. Now a seasoned sailor at the age of thirteen, Alberto teaches Jose the ropes and helps him fit in with the rest of the crew.

Neither boy realizes just how treacherous the man is or the danger each will face on this journey. Pablo Konig aka The Spaniard hears rumors that when the ship reaches Cienfuegos, a stranger will bring aboard a large sum of money. Tired of taking orders and not having the wealth and power he feels he deserves, Pablo enlists the aid of fellow crewman Antonio Rivas and his cousin, Giddy Ebanks, to carry out his plans to take over the vessel, steal the money and cargo, and kill everyone else.

Plans rarely go as conceived and the night Pablo sets for the mutiny is no different. Although he and his cohorts succeed in killing the adults, Jose and Alberto manage to escape. But Alberto suffers from a bad head wound and both boys find themselves adrift in the ocean on a stormy night. Will they reach shore? Will they be rescued? And if rescued, what happens? Are the pirates captured and punished?

These questions arise during the course of this novel, which is based on a true incident. The author deftly interlaces historical and nautical details into the story and his attention to descriptive detail vividly recreates the locales, transporting readers back in time to Cuba before the revolution and the Cayman Islands before they become a tourist destination.

Rather than using a single perspective, Scott spins his tale from a variety of points of view to provide readers with a clear understanding of the act of piracy and subsequent events. Cayman Cross is a fascinating and sometimes poignant tale of treachery and justice, perseverance and friendship, faith and family. Learn more about the author and the book. They find little of value until they stumble upon a buried box containing gold doubloons, a rusty cutlass, and a journal bound in leather.

Rum and Grog Part Three: On the Spanish Main Part Four: